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Schedule

 

 

 

 

PREFACE

Curriculum, syllabus and textbooks are three important documents that decide the course of teaching- learning process in a classroom situation. However it is observed that the school activities mainly revolve around the textbook and receive least impetus from syllabus and curriculum framework. In other words, we may say that textbooks become the de-facto syllabus. Therefore, it is important to bring back the importance of syllabus and orient the teachers in such a manner so that they understand the importance of syllabus and guiding principles of curriculum. It is pertinent to mention here that NCF 2005 emphasizes the following five guiding principles:

  • Connecting knowledge to life outside the school
  • Ensuring that learning is shifted away from rote methods
  • Enriching the curriculum to provide for overall development of children rather than remain textbook centric
  • Making examinations more flexible and integrated into classroom life
  • Nurturing an over-riding identity informed by caring concerns within the democratic polity of the country

The syllabus provides more comprehensive idea of the content, its delivery methodology and effective evaluation. The present split up syllabus, therefore, lays importance on the syllabus document which elaborates the key concepts, themes and evaluation strategies for the teacher. It is expected that all the teachers should go through the syllabus along with the textbooks before getting into the actual teaching- learning process.

Language (ENGLISH)

Input-rich communicational environment are a prerequisite to language learning, since languages are learnt by comprehending and communicating.

The main objectives are:

  • To provide a print rich environment to relate oracy with literacy
  • To develop the abilities of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills
  • To communicate in English with appropriateness and with the right pronunciation
  • To enrich learners vocabulary mainly through telling, retelling, and reading aloud stories/folk tales etc.
  • To use language intelligently and creatively
  • To appreciate the melody of the spoken words and to enjoy learning English
  • To familiarize learners with the basic process of writing

Expected Learning Outcomes are as follows:

  • Able to narrate his/her experiences and incidents
  • Able to exchange his/her ideas with the peers
  • Able to carry out a  brief conversation involving/seeking information
  • Able to enjoy reading a story, poem, a short write- up, a notice, poster etc.
  • Able to take dictation of simple sentences, to practise copy writing from the blackboard and textbook, and to use common punctuation marks
  • Able to write a short description of a person, thing or place – prepare a notice, or write a message for someone
  • Able to write a short composition based on pictures
  • Able to take part in group activity, role play and dramatization

In order to achieve these objectives easily the syllabus has been divided into different Themes/Sub Themes in conformity with the learner’s immediate environment.

The following language items need to be stressed in primary classes:

  • nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs
  • is, am, are, has, have
  • tense-forms ( simple present and present continuous, simple past and past continuous)      expressing future(will and be going to)
  • articles
  • use of this, that, these, those ( as determiners and empty subjects)
  • question words
  • and, or, but
  • Punctuation marks
  • Possessive adjectives
  • Prepositions

LANGUAGE (HINDI)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

 

The syllabus for EVS up to class V has been perceived as an integrated curricular area for the entire Primary stage .The child looks at the environment around her/ him in a holistic manner. EVS Syllabus web has been developed that allows a connected and inter related understanding within a child -centered perspective of themes. The syllabus for classes III-V is woven around six common themes close to a child’s life (i)Family and Friends,(ii)Food, (iii) shelter,(iv) water, (v) Travel and (vi)Things we do and make.

The syllabus web moves outward over the three years. It gradually extends the child’s understanding of their world, beginning from the immediate self to include her family, the neighborhood, the locality and also the country.

Thus by the time the child reaches class V, (s) he is able to see herself in the larger context-as part of a community, the country and also as located in the world. Children should be provided varied kinds of opportunities for them to work individually, in small groups or even in larger groups to promote peer learning and improve social interaction.  Children do not learn alone but learn more through talking and discussing with others. The scaffolding process will enable the children to construct knowledge far beyond their individual abilities through appropriate questions and interventions, including discussion with adults, in school and also at home, as also among themselves.

Issues of differences in gender, class, culture, religion, language etc. need to be handled by the teacher in a sensitive manner. Instead of rote learning, children can be given opportunity to vocalize, build upon his curiosity, learn by doing, ask questions, explore, observe, draw, categories, list, experiment, manipulate things with her/ his hands. Children are to be encouraged to tap resources like family members, members of community, newspapers, storybooks etc. Child`s local knowledge is to be related to school knowledge. EVS learning has to occur outside the walls of the classroom. EVS classrooms need to provide opportunities to children to be able to progressively ask higher order questions that require different levels of reasoning and investigation.

Teachers must translate the syllabus of EVS into Teaching Learning Materials and Experiences, through planned learning tasks and activities, for the classroom, outside the class or even during an examination. EVS teaching has to be integrated and holistic and it must provide opportunities to the child to interact with her environment in the best possible way.

 

MATHEMATICS  

 

We should ensure that children learn to enjoy mathematics rather than fear it. We should realize that mathematics is more than formulae and mechanical procedures. And, more importantly teachers engage every child in class with the conviction that everyone can learn mathematics.

The syllabus for Primary classes has been developed around five natural themes i.e. Geometry (Shapes and Spatial understanding), Numbers (Number operations), Mental Arithmetic, Fractional numbers, Money Measurement and Data handling flowing from classes I – V. It overlaps not only with each other but also with themes developed in other subjects that are being learnt simultaneously.

Teaching of Mathematics should be as far as possible activity oriented. The activities should be built around child’s real life experiences and area across the curriculum. Children’s current local interests and enthusiasm should be utilized to the maximum for developing Maths concepts.

The split up syllabus has incorporated the spirit of continuous comprehensive evaluation (CCE) as well; the mere reading of the document will give a fairly good idea about syllabus and its key concepts. The suggested activities and learning outcomes provide an important lead to effective implementation to CCE. The “Common Minimum Programme for Qualitative improvement in Primary Education” – a flagship programme implemented by KVS, essentially jells well with the spirit of CCE and NCF-2005. I hope that this document will facilitate the teachers to perform their teaching more effectively.

 

 

February 24, 2012                                                                             Avinash Dikshit

(Commissioner, KVS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation of Scholastic Aspect in classes VI to VIII

 

 

The weightage of Formative Assessment (FA) and Summative Assessment (SA) shall be as follows:

Term

Type of Assessment

Percentage of weightage in academic session

Term wise Weightage

Total

FIRST TERM

(April-Sept)

Formative Assessment 1

10

Formative Assessment 1+2

= 20

Formative Assessment

1+2+3+4= 40

 

Summative Assessment

1+2= 60

 

Total= 100

Formative Assessment 2

10

Summative Assessment 1

30

Summative Assessment 1

= 30

SECOND TERM

(Oct-March)

Formative Assessment 3

10

Formative Assessment 3+4

= 20

Formative Assessment 4

10

Summative Assessment 2

30

Summative Assessment 2

= 30

 

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT: Within the class and school time only each subject must have only one Pen-Paper Test under formative assessment. The other modes of assessment must be a part of classroom interactive activities. Pen- Paper Test subject wise will be part of the Formative Assessment 1 in the first term and Formative Assessment 3 in the second term. Formative Assessment 1 and 3 in the form of Pen- Paper Test is likely to be held in the last week of July and the second week of December in each academic session. The marks secured by children out of 40 in the FA 1 and FA 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               will be finally reduced to 10 respectively.

NOTE: A teacher needs to use a series of diagnostic tools like Class test (Written as well as Oral), Surprise Test, Class Responses, Minute Paper (Short descriptions are made by children which give the teacher immediate feedback. It can be done at the end of the class for understanding the effectiveness of teaching-learning process.) etc. during the course of instruction in order to take diagnostic measures for effective learning of children and enable them to write FA 1 and FA 3 with great ease and confidence. Even, the teacher needs to use the feedback of FA 1 and FA3 to take remedial measures to improve the performance of bloomers (slow learners) in SA 1 and SA 3 respectively so that the bloomers could get minimum `D` grade in all the subjects.

 

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: Summative Assessment 1 is likely to be held in the 2nd week of September and Summative Assessment 2 in the 2nd week of March in each academic session. The marks secured by children out of 60 in SA 1 and SA 2 will be finally reduced to 30 respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading Scale

Assessment of Scholastic attainments Part 1 will be reported twice in a year in one academic session.

The nine- point grading scale for measuring Scholastic achievements is given below:

 

Grade

Marks  Range

Grade point

A1

91 -100

10.0

A2

81 - 90

9.0

B1

71 - 80

8.0

B2

61 - 70

7.0

C1

51 - 60

6.0

C2

41 - 50

5.0

D

33 - 40

4.0

E1

21- 32

3.0

E2

00 -20

2.0

Minimum qualifying grade in all the subjects under Scholastic Domain is D. 

 

Note: All assessment with regard to the academic status of the students shall be done in marks and the assessment will be given in grades. Co-Scholastic attainments 2(A, B, C and D) and 3(A, B) will be done on 5- point Scale as shown in the table below. It will be done once in an academic session.

 

Grade

Grade Points

A

4.1- 5.0

B

3.1- 4.0

C

2.1- 3.0

D

1.1- 2.0

E

0 -1.0

Minimum qualifying grade in Co-Scholastic Domain is D. 

Note: As per the directives of RTE, no child will be detained till class VIII. 

Formative Assessment 2 and 4 (Classes VI to VIII)

The following suggested activities may be taken up by the teachers during the process of instruction to assess the expected level of learning in their subjects:

Languages (Hindi /   Sanskrit/ English)

  • Oral and listening - these could be listening comprehension, prepared speech, conversation or dialogue
  • Written assignments - short/ long question answers, creative writing,

reports, newspaper articles, diary entries, poetry etc.

  • Speeches - debates, oratory, recitation, extempore etc.
  • Research projects - information gathering, deductive reasoning, analysis and synthesis and a presentation using a variety of forms including the use of Information Technology (IT)
  • Pair work/group work
  • Peer assessment

 

It is suggested in Languages at least some assessment should be for assessing Conversation   Skills.

Mathematics

  • Problem solving, Multiple choice questions (MCQ)
  • Data handling and analysis
  • Investigative projects
  • Math Lab activities
  • Models including origami etc.
  • Research projects and presentations
  • Group projects
  • Peer assessment
  • Presentations including the use of Information Technology (IT)

 

It is suggested for Mathematics at least some formative assessment tasks should be based on Maths Lab Activities.

Sciences

  • Written assignments, MCQ
  • Experimental  work which may involve one or more of setting experiments,  making observations,  handling data, making deductions, working safely
  • Planning or designing experiments to collect data or to investigate properties, laws, phenomena etc.

 

  • Research work which could be investigative or information gathering and deducing Group work - research or experimental Contextual research projects, Peer assessment
  • Presentations including the use of Information Technology (IT)
  • Science Quiz
  • Seminar
  • Symposium
  • Field Tour
  • Class Response
  • Model Making

It is suggested that for Science at least some formative assessments in the year are experiments and hands-on activities.

Social Sciences

  • Written assignments - short and long answers
  • Commentaries
  • Source-based analysis
  • Projects - investigative, informative, deductive and analytical
  • Research
  • Group work - projects and presentations
  • Models and charts
  • Presentations, including the use of Information Technology (IT)
  • Using authentic sources and primary texts
  • Open book tests
  • Secondary sources
  • Comparison and contrast

It is suggested in Social Science that at least some assessment should be based on projects which are done in groups as in-class activities under the direct supervision of the teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

PREFACE

Curriculum, syllabus and textbooks are three important documents that decide the course of teaching- learning process in a classroom situation. However it is observed that the school activities mainly revolve around the textbook and receive least impetus from syllabus and curriculum framework. In other words, we may say that textbooks become the de-facto syllabus. Therefore, it is important to bring back the importance of syllabus and orient the teachers in such a manner so that they understand the importance of syllabus and guiding principles of curriculum. It is pertinent to mention here that NCF 2005 emphasizes the following five guiding principles:

  • Connecting knowledge to life outside the school
  • Ensuring that learning is shifted away from rote methods
  • Enriching the curriculum to provide for overall development of children rather than remain textbook centric
  • Making examinations more flexible and integrated into classroom life
  • Nurturing an over-riding identity informed by caring concerns within the democratic polity of the country

The syllabus provides more comprehensive idea of the content, its delivery methodology and effective evaluation. The present split up syllabus, therefore, lays importance on the syllabus document which elaborates the key concepts, themes and evaluation strategies for the teacher. It is expected that all the teachers should go through the syllabus along with the textbooks before getting into the actual teaching- learning process.

Language (ENGLISH)

Input-rich communicational environment are a prerequisite to language learning, since languages are learnt by comprehending and communicating.

The main objectives are:

  • To provide a print rich environment to relate oracy with literacy
  • To develop the abilities of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills
  • To communicate in English with appropriateness and with the right pronunciation
  • To enrich learners vocabulary mainly through telling, retelling, and reading aloud stories/folk tales etc.
  • To use language intelligently and creatively
  • To appreciate the melody of the spoken words and to enjoy learning English
  • To familiarize learners with the basic process of writing

Expected Learning Outcomes are as follows:

  • Able to narrate his/her experiences and incidents
  • Able to exchange his/her ideas with the peers
  • Able to carry out a  brief conversation involving/seeking information
  • Able to enjoy reading a story, poem, a short write- up, a notice, poster etc.
  • Able to take dictation of simple sentences, to practise copy writing from the blackboard and textbook, and to use common punctuation marks
  • Able to write a short description of a person, thing or place – prepare a notice, or write a message for someone
  • Able to write a short composition based on pictures
  • Able to take part in group activity, role play and dramatization

In order to achieve these objectives easily the syllabus has been divided into different Themes/Sub Themes in conformity with the learner’s immediate environment.

The following language items need to be stressed in primary classes:

  • nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs
  • is, am, are, has, have
  • tense-forms ( simple present and present continuous, simple past and past continuous)      expressing future(will and be going to)
  • articles
  • use of this, that, these, those ( as determiners and empty subjects)
  • question words
  • and, or, but
  • Punctuation marks
  • Possessive adjectives
  • Prepositions

LANGUAGE (HINDI)

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES  

The syllabus for EVS up to class V has been perceived as an integrated curricular area for the entire Primary stage .The child looks at the environment around her/ him in a holistic manner. EVS Syllabus web has been developed that allows a connected and inter related understanding within a child -centered perspective of themes. The syllabus for classes III-V is woven around six common themes close to a child’s life (i)Family and Friends,(ii)Food, (iii) shelter,(iv) water, (v) Travel and (vi)Things we do and make.

The syllabus web moves outward over the three years. It gradually extends the child’s understanding of their world, beginning from the immediate self to include her family, the neighborhood, the locality and also the country.

Thus by the time the child reaches class V, (s) he is able to see herself in the larger context-as part of a community, the country and also as located in the world. Children should be provided varied kinds of opportunities for them to work individually, in small groups or even in larger groups to promote peer learning and improve social interaction.  Children do not learn alone but learn more through talking and discussing with others. The scaffolding process will enable the children to construct knowledge far beyond their individual abilities through appropriate questions and interventions, including discussion with adults, in school and also at home, as also among themselves.

Issues of differences in gender, class, culture, religion, language etc. need to be handled by the teacher in a sensitive manner. Instead of rote learning, children can be given opportunity to vocalize, build upon his curiosity, learn by doing, ask questions, explore, observe, draw, categories, list, experiment, manipulate things with her/ his hands. Children are to be encouraged to tap resources like family members, members of community, newspapers, storybooks etc. Child`s local knowledge is to be related to school knowledge. EVS learning has to occur outside the walls of the classroom. EVS classrooms need to provide opportunities to children to be able to progressively ask higher order questions that require different levels of reasoning and investigation.

Teachers must translate the syllabus of EVS into Teaching Learning Materials and Experiences, through planned learning tasks and activities, for the classroom, outside the class or even during an examination. EVS teaching has to be integrated and holistic and it must provide opportunities to the child to interact with her environment in the best possible way.

 

MATHEMATICS  

 

We should ensure that children learn to enjoy mathematics rather than fear it. We should realize that mathematics is more than formulae and mechanical procedures. And, more importantly teachers engage every child in class with the conviction that everyone can learn mathematics.

The syllabus for Primary classes has been developed around five natural themes i.e. Geometry (Shapes and Spatial understanding), Numbers (Number operations), Mental Arithmetic, Fractional numbers, Money Measurement and Data handling flowing from classes I – V. It overlaps not only with each other but also with themes developed in other subjects that are being learnt simultaneously.

Teaching of Mathematics should be as far as possible activity oriented. The activities should be built around child’s real life experiences and area across the curriculum. Children’s current local interests and enthusiasm should be utilized to the maximum for developing Maths concepts.

The split up syllabus has incorporated the spirit of continuous comprehensive evaluation (CCE) as well; the mere reading of the document will give a fairly good idea about syllabus and its key concepts. The suggested activities and learning outcomes provide an important lead to effective implementation to CCE. The “Common Minimum Programme for Qualitative improvement in Primary Education” – a flagship programme implemented by KVS, essentially jells well with the spirit of CCE and NCF-2005. I hope that this document will facilitate the teachers to perform their teaching more effectively.

 

 

February 24, 2012                                                                             Avinash Dikshit

(Commissioner, KVS)

 

 

Evaluation of Scholastic Aspect in classes VI to VIII

 

 

The weightage of Formative Assessment (FA) and Summative Assessment (SA) shall be as follows:

Term

Type of Assessment

Percentage of weightage in academic session

Term wise Weightage

Total

FIRST TERM

(April-Sept)

Formative Assessment 1

10

Formative Assessment 1+2

= 20

Formative Assessment

1+2+3+4= 40

 

Summative Assessment

1+2= 60

 

Total= 100

Formative Assessment 2

10

Summative Assessment 1

30

Summative Assessment 1

= 30

SECOND TERM

(Oct-March)

Formative Assessment 3

10

Formative Assessment 3+4

= 20

Formative Assessment 4

10

Summative Assessment 2

30

Summative Assessment 2

= 30

 

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT: Within the class and school time only each subject must have only one Pen-Paper Test under formative assessment. The other modes of assessment must be a part of classroom interactive activities. Pen- Paper Test subject wise will be part of the Formative Assessment 1 in the first term and Formative Assessment 3 in the second term. Formative Assessment 1 and 3 in the form of Pen- Paper Test is likely to be held in the last week of July and the second week of December in each academic session. The marks secured by children out of 40 in the FA 1 and FA 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               will be finally reduced to 10 respectively.

NOTE: A teacher needs to use a series of diagnostic tools like Class test (Written as well as Oral), Surprise Test, Class Responses, Minute Paper (Short descriptions are made by children which give the teacher immediate feedback. It can be done at the end of the class for understanding the effectiveness of teaching-learning process.) etc. during the course of instruction in order to take diagnostic measures for effective learning of children and enable them to write FA 1 and FA 3 with great ease and confidence. Even, the teacher needs to use the feedback of FA 1 and FA3 to take remedial measures to improve the performance of bloomers (slow learners) in SA 1 and SA 3 respectively so that the bloomers could get minimum `D` grade in all the subjects.

 

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: Summative Assessment 1 is likely to be held in the 2nd week of September and Summative Assessment 2 in the 2nd week of March in each academic session. The marks secured by children out of 60 in SA 1 and SA 2 will be finally reduced to 30 respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading Scale

Assessment of Scholastic attainments Part 1 will be reported twice in a year in one academic session.

The nine- point grading scale for measuring Scholastic achievements is given below:

 

Grade

Marks  Range

Grade point

A1

91 -100

10.0

A2

81 - 90

9.0

B1

71 - 80

8.0

B2

61 - 70

7.0

C1

51 - 60

6.0

C2

41 - 50

5.0

D

33 - 40

4.0

E1

21- 32

3.0

E2

00 -20

2.0

Minimum qualifying grade in all the subjects under Scholastic Domain is D. 

 

Note: All assessment with regard to the academic status of the students shall be done in marks and the assessment will be given in grades. Co-Scholastic attainments 2(A, B, C and D) and 3(A, B) will be done on 5- point Scale as shown in the table below. It will be done once in an academic session.

 

Grade

Grade Points

A

4.1- 5.0

B

3.1- 4.0

C

2.1- 3.0

D

1.1- 2.0

E

0 -1.0

Minimum qualifying grade in Co-Scholastic Domain is D. 

Note: As per the directives of RTE, no child will be detained till class VIII. 

Formative Assessment 2 and 4 (Classes VI to VIII)

The following suggested activities may be taken up by the teachers during the process of instruction to assess the expected level of learning in their subjects:

Languages (Hindi /   Sanskrit/ English)

  • Oral and listening - these could be listening comprehension, prepared speech, conversation or dialogue
  • Written assignments - short/ long question answers, creative writing,

reports, newspaper articles, diary entries, poetry etc.

  • Speeches - debates, oratory, recitation, extempore etc.
  • Research projects - information gathering, deductive reasoning, analysis and synthesis and a presentation using a variety of forms including the use of Information Technology (IT)
  • Pair work/group work
  • Peer assessment

 

It is suggested in Languages at least some assessment should be for assessing Conversation   Skills.

Mathematics

  • Problem solving, Multiple choice questions (MCQ)
  • Data handling and analysis
  • Investigative projects
  • Math Lab activities
  • Models including origami etc.
  • Research projects and presentations
  • Group projects
  • Peer assessment
  • Presentations including the use of Information Technology (IT)

 

It is suggested for Mathematics at least some formative assessment tasks should be based on Maths Lab Activities.

Sciences

  • Written assignments, MCQ
  • Experimental  work which may involve one or more of setting experiments,  making observations,  handling data, making deductions, working safely
  • Planning or designing experiments to collect data or to investigate properties, laws, phenomena etc.

 

  • Research work which could be investigative or information gathering and deducing Group work - research or experimental Contextual research projects, Peer assessment
  • Presentations including the use of Information Technology (IT)
  • Science Quiz
  • Seminar
  • Symposium
  • Field Tour
  • Class Response
  • Model Making

It is suggested that for Science at least some formative assessments in the year are experiments and hands-on activities.

Social Sciences

  • Written assignments - short and long answers
  • Commentaries
  • Source-based analysis
  • Projects - investigative, informative, deductive and analytical
  • Research
  • Group work - projects and presentations
  • Models and charts
  • Presentations, including the use of Information Technology (IT)
  • Using authentic sources and primary texts
  • Open book tests
  • Secondary sources
  • Comparison and contrast

It is suggested in Social Science that at least some assessment should be based on projects which are done in groups as in-class activities under the direct supervision of the teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Updated (Friday, 18 January 2013 08:53)